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India

Places Near by delhi (Your Host City)

Being one of the most historic capitals in the world, Delhi has many tourist sites.

In old Delhi, there are attractions like mosques and monuments that represent India's history. The important places in Old Delhi include the majestic Red Fort. New Delhi, on the other hand, is a modern city designed by Edwin Lutyens and Herbert Baker. New Delhi houses many government buildings and embassies, apart from places of historical interest.

The Qutub Minar, Red Fort and Humayun's Tomb are listed as UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

 

Qutub Minar

The Qutub Minar is located in Qutb complex, Mehrauli in South Delhi. It was built by Qutub-ud-din Aibak of the Slave Dynasty, who took possession of Delhi in 1206. It is a fluted red sandstone tower, which tapers up to a height of 72.5 meters and is covered with intricate carvings and verses from the Qur'an. Qutub-ud-din Aibak began constructing this victory tower as a sign of Muslim domination of Delhi and as a minaret for the muezzin to call the faithful to prayer. However, only the first storey was completed by Qutub-ud-din. The other storeys were built by his successor Iltutmish. The two circular storeys in white marble were built by Ferozshah Tughlaq in 1368, replacing the original fourth storey.

Akshardham Temple

It is the third largest Hindu temple in the world. It was built in 2005. In the sprawling 100-acre (0.40 km2) land rests an intricately carved monument, high-technology exhibitions, an IMAX theatre, a musical fountain, a food court and gardens.[1]

Laxminarayan Temple

The temple is built in honour of Lakshmi (Hindu goddess of wealth), and her consort Narayana (Vishnu, Preserver in the Trimurti) by B. R. Birla from 1933 and 1939, when it was inaugurated by Mahatma Gandhi. The side temples are dedicated to Shiva, Krishna and Buddha.

The temple spread over 7.5 acres, is adorned with many shrines, fountains, and a large garden, and also houses Geeta Bhawan for discources. The temple is one of the major attractions of Delhi and attracts thousands of devotees on the Hindu festivals of Janmashtami and Holi.

 

Gurdwara Bangla Sahib

One of the most prominent and largest Gurdwaras in Delhi, Gurdwara Bangla Sahib is the most visited one in the Delhi. Millions visit this Gurdwara from all over the world and of all religions to offer their prayers at this elegant yet historical Gurdwara in Delhi. The Gurdwara marks the place where the eighth Sikh Guru, Guru Harkrishan lived his last breath serving the helpless population ravaged by smallpox and cholera epidemic.[2] The Gurdwara offers free food (langar) to all visitors and devotees throughout the day.

LOTUS TEMPLE

The Lotus Temple, located in New Delhi, India, is a Bahá'í House of Worship completed in 1986. Notable for its flowerlike shape, it serves as the Mother Temple of the Indian subcontinent and has become a prominent attraction in the city. The Lotus Temple has won numerous architectural awards and been featured in hundreds of newspaper and magazine articles.[1] Like all Bahá'í Houses of Worship, the Lotus Temple is open to all, regardless of religion or any other qualification. The building is composed of 27 free-standing marble-clad "petals" arranged in clusters of three to form nine sides,[2] with nine doors opening onto a central hall with height of slightly over 40 metres[3] and a capacity of 2,500 people.[4] A 2001 CNN report referred to it as the most visited building in the world

INDIA GATE

The India Gate situated in Delhi,was part of the work of the Imperial War Graves Commission (IWGC), which came into existence in December 1917 for building war graves and memorials to soldiers killed in the First World War [3] The foundation stone of the All-India War Memorial was laid on 10 February 1921, at 4:30 PM, by the visiting Duke of Connaught in a solemn soldierly ceremony attended by Officers and Men of the Indian Army, Imperial Service Troops, the Commander in Chief, and Chelmsford, the viceroy.[4] On the occasion, the viceroy said, "The stirring tales of individual heroism, will live for ever in the annals of this country", and that the memorial which was a tribute to the memory of heroes, "known and unknown" would inspire, future generations to endure hardships with similar fortitude and "no less valour"

Red Fort

The Red Fort was the residence of the Mughal emperor for nearly 200 years, until 1857. It is located in the centre of Delhi and houses a number of museums. In addition to accommodating the emperors and their households, it was the ceremonial and political centre of Mughal government and the setting for events critically impacting the region.[1]

Constructed in 1648 by the fifth Mughal Emperor Shah Jahan as the palace of his fortified capital Shahjahanabad,[2] the Red Fort is named for its massive enclosing walls of red sandstone and is adjacent to the older Salimgarh Fort, built by Islam Shah Suri in 1546. The imperial apartments consist of a row of pavilions, connected by a water channel known as the Stream of Paradise (Nahr-i-Bihisht). The fort complex is considered to represent the zenith of Mughal creativity under Shah Jahan and although the palace was planned according to Islamic prototypes, each pavilion contains architectural elements typical of Mughal buildings that reflect a fusion of Timurid and Persian traditions

Connaught Place

Connaught Place (Hindi: कनॉट प्लेस, Punjabi: ਕਨਾਟ ਪਲੇਸ, Urdu: کناٹ پلیس, Sindhi:ڪناٽ پليس, officially Rajiv Chowk) is one of the largest financial, commercial and business centres in New Delhi, India. It is often abbreviated to CP and houses the headquarters of several noted Indian firms. The former location of the headquarters of the British Raj, the area's environs occupy a place of pride in the city and are counted among the top heritage structures in New Delhi. It was developed as a showpiece of Lutyens' Delhi with a prominent Central Business District.

Named after Field Marshal Prince Arthur, 1st Duke of Connaught and Strathearn, construction work began in 1929 and was completed in 1933. The Inner Circle of Connaught Place was renamed Rajiv Chowk (after Rajiv Gandhi)[1] while the Outer Circle became Indira Chowk under Union Home Minister S.B.

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